Ouseburn, Newcastle

Ouseburn, NewcastleOuseburn, Newcastle

Client:
Newcastle City Council

Location:
Newcastle upon Tyne

Consultant:
Arup

The masterplan proposals are based on a series of long term city strategies, including the Conservation Area Management Plan (Camp). The urban design process has successfully drawn out what is already there, and is building on and supporting the existing uses - working around and with the remaining historic built fabric. Historically the area was dockside, with a highly dense, industrial urban structure. The masterplan proposes a mix of commercial and residential development to create a sustainable urban village within a designated conservation area.

Based upon the existing street pattern and site ownerships, the Central Ouseburn area is broken down into the three sub-areas of McPhee's Yard, Foundry Lane Basin and Brewery Yard. The masterplan takes the form of a general site layout, together with a set of design guidelines and requirements. These guidelines prescribe the basic arrangement of the site in terms of building plot size, mix of uses, scale and active frontage zones. They build upon the area's industrial urban heritage with high-density, low-rise development, utilising a limited palette of building materials to maintain a continuity with the character of the Ouseburn Valley. The proposals for flexible commercial/studio space, live-work units and affordable residential development work with the existing street pattern to re-establish a fine urban environment and clearly define the streets.

The plan requires all developments to achieve a BREEAM/Eco Homes excellent/Code For Sustainable Homes Level 4 rating including utilising green roof technologies: in this valley situation, most roofs will be seen from above! The plan locates an overspill-parking facility adjacent to a major road access in order to soak up traffic at the edge of the site and restrict vehicles in the central area. Surface car parking is kept to a minimum and any garages are concealed within the building structures.

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